Posted by: nancycurteman | August 7, 2013

The Scottish Haggis: Creature or Sausage?

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Is the treasured Scottish haggis a creature or merely a sausage? After some research, I think I made some interesting discoveries.

DassieThe wild haggis is a small creature, native to the Scottish Highlands.  The Scots who have seen the shy reclusive haggis say the legs on one side of the animal’s body are much longer than those on the other side. This is an adaptation to living on the steep sides of Scottish mountains. Obviously, the Haggis can only travel in one direction as it must always keep its shorter legs on the higher side of the slope or risk tumbling down the mountain. This handicap severely limits the Haggis’ ability to migrate. As a result, there are no wild haggis outside Scotland. The haggis is a protected animal because they only exist in the wild. No one has ever succeeded in breeding haggis in captivity. Seeing a live haggis is supposed to be a sign of imminent good fortune. This fact has made haggis stalking almost a Scottish national sport.

Haggis is served at the Burns Supper an annual event held on the anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns on January 25. On this day Scotland’s National dish, haggis, and Scotland’s finest whisky are combined. At the Supper the haggis is delivered on a silver platter amidst pomp and ceremony.

haggis-1At the table, one diner is accorded the honor of delivering a heartfelt address to the haggis. After raising their glasses in toast to the haggis, the guests devour the tasty sausage made from heart, lungs and liver, minced fine and blended with spices.

So what is the answer to the question: Scottish haggis: creature or sausage? It’s both.

More Travel Tips:

Stonehenge and the Amesbury Archer Mystery
Cardiff, Wales: Something for Everyone
Old Sarum: Five Thousand Years of History

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Responses

  1. Thanks, NC! The haggis on the rocks looks like the haggis on the platter (served with scotch on the rocks). 😀

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    • When I first tried haggis in Glasgow, I drank two whisky chasers with it.

      Like

  2. Awe. Makes me want to be a vegetarian. Interesting post though. 🙂

    Like


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